Tag Archives: peanut allergy

Food Allergy Reaction

This topic is always my biggest concern.  Obviously, I am always thinking about how to help Little R live a normal life while avoiding a potential food allergy reaction, especially a life threatening one.  He has had a few sporadic reactions over the years since his first one that almost took his life.  None of them required an Epi-Pen, but my biggest concern with this is that it can cause us to become complacent.

A lot of people are under the impression that all food allergy reactions will be like the first one.  They think that all symptoms will be the same, or that because the first reaction was not life threatening, that a life threatening one is unlikely. 

I cannot say it any clearer that THIS IS NOT TRUE!  I don’t know how many people I have talked to that have food allergy children, or care for one, and they inevitably make the comment that “They just get red around the mouth.  They have never had a life threatening reaction.”  Or, “Their reactions are NEVER anaphylactic.”  I believe that this is what makes death due to a food allergy reaction HIGH RISK!  I have read, and heard it said at FAAST food allergy meetings, that the number one cause of death from a food allergy reaction is FAILURE TO USE THE EPI-PEN IN TIME!  If you care for a food allergy child, you must first believe that any reaction could be potentially turn life threatening and be prepared to use the Epi-Pen! 

Ask any family who has lost a child due to a food allergy reaction.  I would bet that none of these families were the ones who were what most people would call “overprotective” when it came to their child’s food allergy.  I do not mean any disrespect to these parents.  I know how easy it is to live in denial or ignorance about food allergies.  Doctors just do not do a good enough job educating about them.  But, I just know too many other parents and care givers who live in this fog, and I wish for them to wake up, so to speak.

Read the story of  BJ Horn, or Emily Vonder Meulen.  Both of these children were loved by their parents, but ended up dying from food allergy reactions (namely peanut allergy) because the volatility of their allergy was not understood completely.  Click on their names to read their stories, and pay attention to the part where their parents basically say, “We didn’t know/believe that their allergy would be truly life threatening.”

Nobody wants to believe that they could lose their child, especially because of  food.  But, if your child has a food allergy, you MUST start taking this seriously!  If your child has a peanut allergy, you especially need to be on alert as peanut allergies appear to be the MOST volatile.

*BJ Horn link is from Allergy Moms blog.  Gina does a great job educating about food allergies.  I recommend reading her website and blog.

*Emily Vonder Meulen link is from Food Allergy Angel website.  Paul has developed this website to help share Emily’s story in an effort to educate others about food allergies.

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Filed under advocating, always be prepared, Anaphylaxis, food allergy reactions, food allergy support

Making the Most of It

The other evening, we put together a very impromptu get together with some neighbor friends.  What was a bad experience, turned into a great one!

Earlier that day we were at a family gathering for a graduation party.  These kind of get togethers are always a little nerve racking for me because of Little R’s food allergies.  As you can imagine, there is always a lot of food around with so many people to feed.  My family has gotten pretty good at thinking and planning ahead so that Little R can have a safe visit, but this visit turned ugly!

There were a lot of kids visiting at this gathering, so one of my uncles had planned for a fun activity for them.  The first red flag, or what should have been for me, was when he gathered the kids and had them go search for pine cones.  Yeah, you know where this is going.  I was busy socializing with other relatives, having my own fun, so I was not paying much attention.  The next thing I know, Little R came up to me with a very frightened look on his face and told me that all the kids were playing in PEANUT BUTTER!  You can imagine the skipped beat that my heart experienced at that moment!

I couldn’t believe my eyes!  Little R, with a very sad face, walked off to the other side of the yard and told me he would just play alone until they were done.  BUT, that was NOT good enough!  Peanut butter is not easy to clean up!  I knew that no matter how much effort was placed in hand washing, there would still be peanut butter lingering.  This party was no longer safe for Little R.

I very quickly decided that we HAD to leave.  What was worse was that Little C was covered in said peanut butter!  I had my mom take him inside to wash up as best as she could until we could get home for a real shower and change of clothes.  Little R was NOT happy about my decision to leave.  So, I very quickly came up with a change in plans… our own backyard bon-fire!

I quickly called my hubby to send him out for a fire-pit.  I then called some of our friends in the neighborhood.  We ended up having a GREAT time that night roasting marshmallows and making S’mores.  In spite of the horrific experience earlier in the day, it just goes to show what a positive attitude can do.  (And, no, my attitude was not positive at first, I must confess…)

I am sorry for the long post, but I had to get all of that off my chest!  You are probably wondering why I am sharing so many details.  I think it is important for our friends and family members to get a clear picture of what it is like living with these horrible food allergies.  Thanks for listening.

Little R enjoying one very yummy S'more! Little R enjoying one very yummy S’more!

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Filed under food allergies and friends, Our personal journey

Food Residue Really IS Everywhere!

In regards to my sons food allergies, I worry all the time about the food residue that might be lurking around unseen.  When we attend a party or other gathering that includes food, my anxiety level is hightened because the offending food is within eyesight.  After reading Heather Legg’s article, Allergens Are Everywhere, Arn’t They? I discovered why I am still feeling unsettled in other settings. 

There are countless times when food residue may be present but invisible!  Heather mentions places like the grocery cart at the store and door handles at school where the “peanut free zones” do not apply.  This reminded me of an experience we encountered just yesterday.  I took my son to a local high school play.  During intermission many people visited the snack bar and brought some of their snacks into the theatre for the remaining performance.  Just after we sat down, my son grabbed my arm and said, “Mom!  That girl (sitting next to him) is eating candy and it IS NOT SKITTLES!”  I explained to the girl why he was worried, and I had him move to the other side of my seat.  I, of course, started wondering if his new seat might not have the presence of something he is allergic to.  While people with mild food allergies may not be as frightened by these scenerios, my son has a severe peanut allergy and will have a potentially life-threatening reaction witin seconds if the offending food residue were to enter his system! 

It was kind of refreshing for me to read Heather’s story because I have been struggling with this thought for a while now.  There are many people out there who do not truly understand the subject of food allergies.  Some of these people have claimed to be doctors and have even written articles claiming that food allergies are a hoax!  This causes people like me, the parent of a food allergic child, a lot of stress for a host of reasons.  The reality is that food allergies DO exsist, and every food allergic child is different.  Some children will experience only mild symptoms during a reaction, and others more extreme and life threatening.  I witnessed my son almost lose his life during his first reaction.  This was only after a pea-sized taste of peanut butter!  I guess I will never be able to get that image out of my mind. 

I have finally come to terms with the fact that I am a parent of a child who is severly allergic to peanuts.  I have made the choice to follow my gut instinct when it comes to protecting him and to stop worrying about what the rest of the world thinks.  After all, isn’t that our number one goal as parents… keeping our children safe?

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Filed under always be prepared, food allergies and school, travel w/food allergies

Peanut Allergies and Reactions to Lupin

My friend Paul from Food Allergy Angel sent me an email linking to a story on Science Daily that reports a caution to people with peanut allergy.  Lupin is in the legume family the same as peanuts.  Apparently there have been cases of people with peanut allergy that have reacted to foods with the Lupin ingredient. 

I found the article interesting.  When I learn of new things such as this, my first thought is wether for not little R has had the ingredient in question.  I am happy to have the heads up, but at the same time learning of new things that can harm my little precious being causes me a lot of anxiety.  I would love to dismiss this new piece of information, but I know first hand that other foods in the legume family can indeed cause a reaction to my peanut allergic child.  He happens to be allergic to peas for this very reason!

Maybe this will help some of you with a mystery reaction or two.  I would love to know if anyone else has heard of the Lupin news.

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Filed under food allergies in the news, food labeling

Venting My Frustration

If you have ever read my “about” page, you will know that I mentioned that I would sometimes use this blog to vent.  There are many struggles a food allergy parent faces, and one of them happens to involve other newly diagnosed food allergy children and their families.  Well, actually, I should clarify that I mean the allergist or other doctors that they have seen are the problem.

This frustration comes a little deeper because I remember too well being in these “new” parents’ shoes.  I remember leaving the hospital, then the pediatrician’s office, then the allergist’s office and feeling completely overwhelmed. 

I remember, clearly, the visit to the ER that first day.  The ER doctor was very nice, but this is all he told me. 

“Food allergies can be life-threatening, and in the case of your son, he almost lost his life today after that peanut butter taste.  You need to carry these Epi-Pens because they are the only thing that could save his life if this happened again.  Next, you should see your doctor for more information.  There are also some websites, I think one is www.foodallergy.org to learn more.  Be careful, because peanuts show up in the most unexpected places.  There are candies out there that you would never think peanut could be involved in.  Good Luck!” 

No, I was not shown how to use the Epi’s, I was not told why I should have two with my son at all times.  No, I was not told that I should use them even in the event that I am not sure he is having a reaction, but maybe he is, that it is better to ere on the side of caution.  (I was guessing I should wait to see what happens, which now we know that waiting could cost him his life!)  I was not told what all the signs are of a reaction.  All I had to go by was what I witnessed that morning-  hives around his mouth first, followed by wheezing in his chest, and once in the ambulance, hives and eczema all over his body!  Of course, there is a list of possible signs of a food allergy reaction.

The next step was to the pediatrician.  I have to state here that I love everything about our pediatrician except the knowledge of food allergies.  It was a doctor in the practice who, at his 1 year check up, gave me the instructions to feed him the “fattening foods” to help him gain wait.  These were specifically eggs, and peanut butter (among other things.)  Later I learned that the doctor’s who specialize in food allergies specifically say DO NOT FEED ANY CHILD PEANUT BUTTER BEFORE AGE 3- ESPECIALLY IF THEY HAVE ANY OF THE RISK FACTORS –family history of allergies (any kind, it does not have to be food allergies in particular), or The child has eczema.  In our case, I, his mother, grew up with and still deal with A LOT of allergies!  Sadly, my son has really bad eczema that started at only one month of age!  This doctor should never have given me the okay to feed him peanut butter!  The other problem with the ped office, in regards to our food allergy visit, was that I was not given any more information than the ER gave me except for more websites to search.  I was pretty much left alone to figure this out.

So, off to the allergy doctor.  I had scheduled this appointment to have him officially tested to get a baseline for his food allergy and to see if there were any others.  We learned at this appointment that he is indeed allergic to peanuts, in addition there are tree-nuts and eggs.  I believe I was asked if I had Epi-Pens and if I knew how to use them- and that was it!  Off to home I went.

About a week later, I realized that I was still feeling in the dark.  I can’t really explain it.  I guess it was a mother’s instinct or the fact that I was reading on the Internet all about food allergies.  I ended up scheduling another food allergy appointment with a different allergist for more testing on the rest of the top 8(that I learned about via Internet, not from a doctor!)  I was happy to learn that we were still only left with the three that he was originally tested for.  The only other new thing I learned that day was that I now had to check all food labels.  That is right, I was not explained this in the first place, it was about a week or so later at this second allergy visit!  I was handed three laminated cards with about 30 to 50 words written on each.  I was told to read all food labels and make sure none of these words were listed in the ingredients.  HOLY COW!  Talk about overwhelming!  Have you ever tried to read a food label in the first place?  Talk about a bunch of mumble jumble. (Thanks to the new labeling law, the top 8 food allergens now have to be listed in plain English, thank you.) 

So, in a nutshell, this is where I was left.  I slowly started to adjust our life around this food allergy situation.  I read tons of articles on-line about food allergies.  Some of these websites proved helpful, and I have listed them on my sidebar for easy access.  I eventually contacted our local food allergy support group FAAST and was given a wealth of information.  Cindy Moseley, the leader, called me personally on the phone to let me know they received my information through the website.  She told me how important it was to carry two Epi-Pens at all times (one could malfunction, or it could take too long for emergency services to arrive.  The medicine could wear off in 15 -20 minutes.)  She told me about Medic Alert and suggested I look into it for a bracelet for my son.  She even told me of a great cookbook that I could get to bake with out eggs!  I seriously think I was on the phone with her for about an hour.  It was the most support I had felt through the process at this point.

Through the years of spending my time being proactive reading and attending the FAAST meetings, I have learned a lot of information. 

Back to what kills me! 

Just about every time I meet a new food allergy parent, they seem to be so “green” in this area.  I was just talking to a friend yesterday who learned only weeks ago that her 18 month old is anaphylactic to peanuts.  She was fed peanut butter and almost lost her life.  It took 2 doses of meds at the ER to stop her reaction!  Yes, when I asked about Epi- Pens, they have them, and they were shown how to use them.  BUT, I still don’t think they understand how serious the situation is!  I think the biggest thing that stuck out to me was that my friend told me she wishes she knew how serious her child’s food allergy to peanut butter really is.  I quickly explained to her that, “Hey, she had anaphylactic reaction!  It doesn’t get more serious than that!  You know she could lose her life if she ingests anymore peanut.  Peanut allergies are so unpredictable.  You don’t know if the next reaction will be just like the first one.”  I told her, too, that each exposure could result in stronger reactions.  She said her husband wanted to give the child a taste at home to see what would happen!  Of course, I reminded myself that it isn’t their fault.  I BLAME THE DOCTORS!  They should have been explained details of the food allergy during their visit with the doctor!  Don’t these doctors realize that the parents are only going to follow their lead?  So, now I have the job, as a worried mom (that is how I am most looked at, I am sure) to explain all of this to her.  I urged her NOT to do any kind of food challenge at home.  I told her that children can die within minutes of an exposure.  She then said they were thinking about wiping some peanut butter on her skin to see what would happen. UGH!

Has anyone else had an experience like this one?  This is sadly not the first parent I have met who was not educated thoroughly about peanut allergy.  I am so worried, and I don’t know what to do.  I realize that outside of sharing my knowledge, there isn’t much I can do.

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Filed under advocating, always be prepared, Anaphylaxis, food allergy support

What a Nightmare!

     I just read a news story about a middle school student in Lexington, KY.  The student, who has a known allergy to peanut, was harassed by a fellow student when the he put peanut butter cookie crumbs into the victim’s lunchbox.  (You can read the story here.)  I know that huge strides have been made (thanks to all of the moms who are responsible!), but I have to say that when I hear stories like this, I become even more grounded in my decision to home school!

     I am sure, or at least I hope, that the student responsible for the incident performed did so out of pure stupidity and not menace.  Just as soon as I think people are “getting it” about how serious food allergies are, I am brought back to reality-  school is just not safe enough(in my own humble opinion) for my peanut allergy child!  I cannot take that chance.  I love him too dearly to put him in harms way.

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Filed under food allergies in the news